Superhero Kids: An Austin Non-Profit Helping Families

Let me tell you about an amazing Austin-based non-profit organization. They work hard every day to improve the lives of people who need them most.

Recently, I was introduced to this group of kindhearted Austinites, known as Superhero Kids. They quietly assist children and families who have been affected by cancer and blood disorders.

Founded in December 2009, Superhero Kids works to improve the quality of life of children and their families at the Children’s Blood and Cancer Center of Central Texas, at Dell Children’s Hospital. Their other primary purpose is to make Austin aware of the progress made in the name of children battling life-threatening illnesses.

You may know a child afflicted with such a disease. The CBCC currently treats around 400 patients per year, and 70-85 Austin kids are diagnosed every year. They are the kids playing baseball down the street, or clustered together in groups walking home from school. You and I tend to see these children as mere kids, but those working with the Children’s Blood and Cancer Center (CBCC) see what we do not. They see these courageous children as real superhero kids.

I can’t imagine how much courage it takes to fight cancer and blood disorders at age seven, but somehow these kids do it. Children diagnosed with Childhood Leukemia today have a 75-85% success rate.

But dealing with these kinds of hardships demands a lot of money, time, and emotional strength. Both the children and parents must deal with the costs. That means medical bills, which can pull away most if not all of a family’s resources, and time that must be devoted to scheduling treatments and subsequent therapies, which often pulls at least one parent from work when money is extremely tight. Given the long duration of these treatments, the financial and emotional effects upon the affected family can be earth-shattering.

The Superhero Kids organization provides financial assistance to the CBCC to alleviate  the expenses that families must shoulder. Treatment costs a lot of money, and much of it isn’t reimbursed by insurance companies. Transportation, basic living expenses, and special educational needs are just a few of the problems faced by the parents of superhero children.

For the past two years, Teagan Boyd, age seven, has raised money for Superhero Kids instead of asking for birthday gifts. Her and her friend Parker are the ultimate superheroes.

The organization can always use assistance from individuals in the Austin area. If you enjoy volunteering or supporting worthwhile causes, look no further. There are a few ways you can help. You can volunteer your time by joining Superhero Kids fundraisers, or by hosting a fundraiser of your own. If you would rather donate monetarily, Superhero Kids accepts gift cards as well. Your cards can be for anything from groceries to gasoline. According to the Superhero Kids website, here is how your donation helps:

$10:
• Pays for 2 cafeteria lunch coupons for family members accompanying a patient for treatment.
• Pays parking for a family for 1 day.

$100
• Pays for arts and crafts supplies at the CBCC for 2 weeks.

$500
• Pays for buying wigs for 4 patients.
• Pays for food and clothing for families in need due to expensive medical treatments

$1,500
• Pays for neurological testing of patients, which helps assist children with learning challenges that come as a result of cancer treatment and hematology diagnosis.

$5,000
• Pays for end of life services for families in need.

$50,000
• Pays for a Child Life Specialist for 1 year, to work with children to learn how to manage their fears and pain as they go through the hematology and cancer process.

You can reach the Superhero Kids HERE to donate what you can spare. These people are genuine heroes who struggle everyday to bring light and happiness to children battling the grimmest situations. Be sure to click HERE to like them on Facebook and show your support also.

A little support can make a large difference.

Volunteers are the heart and soul of Superhero Kids.

 

Austinot Dusty asks:
Do you have a superhero kid in your life? Tell us the story.

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  • http://www.superherokids.org/ Samia

    Thank you so much for sharing this story-the kids and families that are supported  are truly amazing and battle cancers and blood disorders with the courage and strength of true Superheros.  Hat’s off to these wonderful children and families

    • Austinot Dustin

      You’re absolutely right, Samia! Hats off to those brave kids and their families. Thank you for all that you do. Austin and the rest of Central Texas appreciates your work! Will you be hosting any events in the near future?

      • Sdjoseph

        Superhero Kids has a group of runners in tomorrow’s Texas Round Up 5K race and Family mile. These kids and families have participated in the Survivorship Challenge- a program designed to reintroduce physical activity to daily lives during and after treatment for Cancers and Blood Disorders. Best of luck to all our kids!

  • Kalie

    Such an amazing organization!!

    • Austinot Dustin

      They are truly amazing, Kalie. Thanks for commenting. Do you know a superhero kid?

  • http://twitter.com/molguin Matthew Olguin

    What a great project and organization. – need to spread the word and let more people know what is done here, and how to help!  Thanks Superhero Kids and Austinot

    • Austinot Dustin

      I agree, Matthew! Thanks Superhero Kids! Please share the post with anybody you know who would appreciate the work SK does. 

  • Brent

    What a great cause. I couldn’t imagine what it would be like to go through an ordeal at such a young age like these brave kids are, it’s good to know that there’s nonprofits like this working to give them a chance at having a happy childhood. 

    • Austinot Dustin

      Totally. People like the volunteers at Superhero Kids do such a great service for these kids. Have you ever been involved in a non-profit organization?

    • Uncle Steve

      Parker is my nephew, it is unbelievable hell to watch a child go through any form of cancer treatment.  Just walking down the hall of Dell’s Children Hospital will tear at your heart.  We just celebrated his 9th birthday the other day and hope for many many more.

  • Artemis

    It is refreshing to see organizations, especially in a time when we as a country are so inwardly focused on the “winners” and our own personal greed to see something like this program.  No one, from students to executives, in Austin has an excuse to not give at least the minimum amount.

    • Austinot Dustin

      Wow. I like what you’re saying, Artemis. Ten dollars really isn’t much at all. I hope more people like you read this blog and come to the same conclusions. 

  • Haleigh Burger

    These kids are definitely my heroes!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1158574418 Troy Herman

    Thanks again Austinot for posting another great piece.

    • http://www.facebook.com/eric.highland Eric Highland

      Thank you Troy for being a loyal subscriber! We appreciate you.

  • Casey H

    I am a superhero kid! I have Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia, and I was awarded the first Superhero Kid’s College Scholarship, which let me start my college career as a longhorn at our very own UT. Go Superhero kids!

    • http://www.facebook.com/eric.highland Eric Highland

      That is a great story Casey! Glad to hear of how SHK helped you achieve your goals. Always love to hear about the success of these programs from the people impacted by them the most. And thanks for checking out the Austinot!